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10 Top Design Trends For 2017

Here at franklintill, rather than perpetuate micro fads and fashions, we like to look at the bigger picture and what this means for design across the lifestyle industries. We research and uncover some of the future thinking by speaking to visionary designers working with innovative tech, materials and processes.

For the last year, we have been curating the trends section of computer arts magazine – identifying emerging, still fresh and mainstream movements for further exploration. Here we’ll give a recap of the most exciting emerging areas – as exemplified by key projects – and draw together some conclusions to help you with the next year’s worth of creative briefs.

In general, we’ve noticed that materiality is more important than ever, and not just in the real world, but in the virtual world too. How can we exploit new materials for a better future and how can we engage people through technology to have a more engaging experience via our screens?

Forward-thinking designers are considering not just aesthetics, but also the materials and processes used in order to create sustainable alternatives – from built-in recycling systems, to harvesting waste and abundance, we expect more designers to consider the bigger picture.

In general, we’ve noticed that materiality is more important than ever, and not just in the real world, but in the virtual world too. How can we exploit new materials for a better future and how can we engage people through technology to have a more engaging experience via our screens?

Forward-thinking designers are considering not just aesthetics, but also the materials and processes used in order to create sustainable alternatives – from built-in recycling systems, to harvesting waste and abundance, we expect more designers to consider the bigger picture.

Spearheading the future food trend, space10’s project meatball gave us the lean green algae ball and crispy bug ball.

As our lives become more virtual, artists like lucy hardcastle are seeking to translate the digital into the ‘digi-real’. Maintaining the rendered gloss effect of her digital work, her ultra-slick pieces are created using electro-flocked velour and crystal-clear blown glass.